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What To Know About Neutering

Unless you are planning to become a breeder, having your pet neutered is wise in order to avoid unwanted pregnancies. Even if you have an indoor pet that lacks opportunities to mate, the procedure has a variety of health benefits to be considered. 

Cats and rabbits can be neutered from four months old and dogs from six months, though timing can vary according to your pet’s size and breed. We can advise you on the best timing for your pet.

Male pets are castrated (their testicles removed) and female pets have their ovaries and usually their womb removed, which is called spaying. Though he or she may look young, your pet can become pregnant (or impregnate others) while still immature. And unneutered siblings of the opposite sex can also mate.

Before the operation, your pet will need a health check in case there are any reasons why they shouldn’t have the general anaesthetic required for the procedure. The procedure lasts up to an hour and your pet will usually come home the same day.

Your dog: What to expect?

Your vet or vet nurse will provide you with tailored instructions dependent on the surgery type, pet breed, size and temperament. This will including feeding pre- and post-op, as well as pain relief, wound care, exercise plans and post-op checks. Your dog is likely to have made a full recovery within a fortnight.

The benefits:

  • Unneutered male dogs are at a higher risk of testicular tumours. Neutering also helps prevent some prostate conditions.
  • Neutering lowers the risk of female dogs developing mammary and ovarian tumours – as well as serious womb infections, which can occur following any season/menstrual cycle. 
  • After being castrated, male dogs are less likely to hump, scent-mark or roam looking for a mate. Female dogs are less likely to be pestered by male dogs.

Your cat: What to expect?

Your vet or vet nurse will provide you with tailored instructions dependent on the surgery type, pet breed, size and temperament. This will including feeding pre- and post-op, as well as pain relief, wound care, exercise plans and post-op checks. Your cat is likely to have made a full recovery within a fortnight.

The benefits:

  • Neutering your female cat helps to avoid mammary and ovary tumours and womb infections – and the health risks of pregnancy.
  • Unneutered male cats tend to be more aggressive, to roam and fight over females or territory. This can make them susceptible to abscesses and diseases such as so-called feline aids (FIV) and leukaemia (FeLV).
  • Your cat is likely to be less stressed about other animals and its environment after neutering. Neutering also lessens their likelihood to spray and mark territory indoors and out.

Your rabbit: What to expect?

Your vet or vet nurse will provide you with tailored instructions for pre- and post-op care of your rabbit, which will include feeding, pain relief, bedding, wound care, exercise plans and post-op checks.

Following the operation, male rabbits will need to be kept apart from unspayed female rabbits for six weeks as amazingly they can still be fertile during this time. 

The benefits:

  • Female rabbits can be calmer after spaying. It also cuts the risk of common uterine tumours (adenocarcinoma) and infection.
  • Male rabbits will no longer spray urine (like cats) – and aggressive pre-op male rabbits should become calmer.

Case Study

Holly Louise Eells decided to have her black cat Prince neutered when she adopted him from a friend at around nine months. “He was spraying [urine marking] everywhere and howling at night because he wanted to get out. He was also aggressive towards other cats, so I decided to have him ‘done’ as I have with all my cats. It was pretty simple. I dropped him off at the vet’s and was called to pick him up later that day. He was a bit quiet for a couple of days and had to wear a collar to ensure he didn’t lick his wound. It was worth it though. He was like a changed cat afterwards - much calmer and more affectionate.”

Practice information

Vermuyden Veterinary Practice

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  • Mon
    8:15am - 7:00pm
  • Tue
    8:15am - 7:00pm
  • Wed
    8:15am - 7:00pm
  • Thu
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  • Fri
    8:15am - 7:00pm
  • Sat
    8:30am - 12:00pm
  • Sun
    Closed

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162 Boothferry Road Goole East Yorkshire DN14 6AH
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Please call this number for emergencies:

01405 763058